Harrowsmith's Almanac

Written by Canadians for Canadians

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Harrowsmith’s Almanac is famous for home-grown editorials on country living in Canada with a modern twist. Our four issues per year are delivered in Harrowsmith’s signature style. The Almanac and its ancillary magazines satisfy a desire for a less hectic, simpler lifestyle. Written by Canadians for Canadians who currently live the country life, aspire to someday or simply want a little country in their urban lifestyle.

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moongate-publishingHarrowsmith's Truly Canadian Almanac is produced by Moongate Publishing Inc. Please visit moongate.ca for more information.
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    The much anticipated launch of our digital editions will be around the 22nd of September 2014. We look forward to your comments.

  • Veggies in all the colours of the rainbow

    The Best Canadian Seed Companies

    Harrowsmith's 35th annual guide to the best Canadian seed companies and specialty nurseries, with 125 listings!

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    Chewing up the Scenery

    Popular Plants Can Poison Your Pets: Baneberry, Deadly nightshade, Lambkill… As their folk names suggest, many seemingly innocent plants are a real hazard if eaten. It’s normal for cats and dogs to chew on long grass and other greenery. To ensure that poisonous plants aren’t on the menu, all gardeners with pets (not to mention young children or visiting grandkids) should poison-proof their gardens.

    Growing lavender from seed

    Lavender: Little Patch of Heaven

    What's the Best Hardy Lavender to Grow from Seeds? Best of the Harrowsmith Garden Trials.

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    Harrowsmith Goes to Soupfest!

    Catch our publisher, Yolanda Thornton, chatting with the soupsational Marty Galin at the Holland Marsh Soupfest.

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    Bake your own Gingerbread Ornaments

    What fun to get together in December and bake your own gingerbread tree ornaments. They're edible, but the extra flour makes them tough enough to hang on the tree and to last a few years if kept in the freezer. We think they also make great hostess gifts. So make a lot, or be ready to repeat the ritual with your family, friends and loved ones with an annual gingerbread-decorating party!

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    Best Ever Chocolate Chip Cookies

    Honestly, there's never been a tastier chocolate chip cookie than this one.

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    ‘Small Ponds’ Congratulates Lynn Coady on her Giller Prize!

    Harrowsmith's Truly Canadian Almanac congratulates Lynn Coady for winning the prestigious Giller Prize. We want to celebrate by revisiting Lynn Coady's home-town tour in "Small Ponds," an exclusive interview that appeared in our debut Almanac, back in 2008. We loved her then, and we love her still. Go, Lynn, go!

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    Shaun Majumder’s Tour of Burlington, Newfoundland & Labrador

    Gemini Award-winning actor/comedian Shaun Majumder (This Hour Has 22 Minutes and much more) gives the Harrowsmith Almanac an exclusive (and entertaining) home-town tour of Burlington, Newfoundland and Labrador.

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    Robert Bateman’s Tour of Salt Spring Island, B.C.

    Canada’s best known visual artist, Robert Bateman, gives Harrowsmith's Truly Canadian Almanac an exclusive tour of Salt Spring Island, British Columbia, where he has found inspiration for his paintings for more than 23 years.

    Fall weather will make up for bummer of a summer

    Welcome to Your 2015 Weather

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    How to Spot The Christmas Comet

    Our Astronomy editor, Robert Dick, tells us exactly how to spot ISON, the “Comet of the Century,” before it’s too late...

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    ISON: The Exasperating Comet

    We asked Robert Dick, our Astronomy Editor, for his take on Comet ISON, the bright light in the sky which seems to be exasperating night-sky watchers and failing to become “The Christmas Comet” / “Comet of the Century” that it was supposed to be.

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    Stompin’ Tom Connors’ 3000-year Calendar

    Back in 2010, the Canadian music legend Stompin’ Tom Connors agreed to share his 3000-year calendar with the readers of HARROWSMITH’S TRULY CANADIAN ALMANAC. He was a fan of the Almanac and a true Canadian hero. We will miss him.

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    Stranger Danger?

    In her back-page column, "Footnotes from the Grasslands," award-winning Saskatchewan novelist Sharon Butala ponders the influx of urban people into small towns and rural places across Canada. What are they looking for? And what have they got to offer us?

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    Advice from the Country Know-It-All

    Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about Rural Living... but Were Afraid to Ask!

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    Burden of Fame

    Words Of Wisdom From The World-Famous Dionne Sisters On The Occasion Of Their 75th Birthday

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    Ode to the Canadian Automobile

    Even though they cost the earth...even though we spend endless hours in traffic...even though they are one of the worst culprits behind the global warming crisis...cars still capture the hearts of canadians. Here’s a nostalgic look at our continuing—if jaded—love affair with the automobile.

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    Calling All Readers: Whatsit?

    Do you know what this thing is? Take a close look and if you can enlighten us on the subject, you could win a year’s subscription to HARROWSMITH’S TRULY CANADIAN ALMANAC. We’ll be sure to publish the winning answer in a future edition. Good luck, and thanks for your help!

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    Quiz Winner: Whatsit?

    Most every old barn hides a “whatsit” or two. Whatsits are once-useful gadgets that have been gathering grime for generations, having long outlived their original purpose. Today, these found items are nothing less than a mystery to most barn owners. Heck, some of the doodads we collected for our quiz last year even stumped our panel of experts.